Neem & the Environment

Our climate is changing. Over the past century the scientific community has documented dramatic shifts in global temperature, the rise of extreme weather patterns and the on-going deterioration of the ozone layer. The human race has become such a geophysical force that we are pushing ourselves into a new geological age, one that is now being referred to as the Anthropocene.

There is a clear-cut consensus, reaffirmed by extensive recent research conducted globally, that the burning of fossil fuels and the subsequent production of greenhouse gases is one of the main factors behind the earth’s warming temperatures, more commonly described as climate change. One of the more practical and achievable ways to mitigate this change, cleanse our environment and ensure an equitable future is to lock up or sequester more carbon from the atmosphere through the planting of more trees worldwide.

Every single living being on the planet benefits from the clean air, water, and climate regulation provided by forests, and at least 1.6 billion people depend directly on forests for food, fuel, shelter and income. In the last 40 years, more than one billion acres of tropical forests have vanished, equivalent in size to over half of the continental United States. The pace of deforestation is so great it accounts for 15% of global carbon dioxide emissions annually. By utilizing available atmospheric CO2 in photosynthesis, trees and forests provide a simple and effective natural ‘sink’ for manmade pollutant activities, and are now considered fundamental to managing climate change.

A Leader in Carbon Offsetting

One of the more practical and achievable ways to reverse this trend, cleanse our environment and ensure an equitable future is to lock up or sequester more carbon from the atmosphere through the simple process of planting more trees worldwide. For those examining the benefits of planting trees, neem trees tick many of the boxes for its suitability. It has a high rate of photosynthesis and liberates more oxygen than many other tree species, being able to ‘fix’ more than 14 μmol of CO2 m-1 sec-1. A hardy, drought resistant tree, with a thick foliage, single trunk, very high leaf surface area and wide canopy, neem provides a good platform for maximum CO2 fixation, able to provide a shield against other pollution components. With its extensive and deep root system, neem can flourish and grow even in poor and leached soils.

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